Fairy-lore Collection

22 stories

Elidor, or the Golden Ball

By

There appeared to the boy two little men, saying: ‘If thou wilt come with us, we will lead thee into a land full of sports and delights.’

EuropeWales

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Elves in Scotland: Changelings

By

One night John Roy was going over the mountains, when he fell in with a company of Elves, whose mode of travelling clearly indicated that they were carrying a person off with them.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Descent and Form

By

They are doomed to wander amid mountains and lakes till the day of judgment, in ignorance of their sentence whether they shall be pardoned or condemned, but they fear the worst.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Dwellings and Mode of Life

By

Joy and mirth reign in such assemblies of the fairies; for they are particularly fond of dancing, and it is one of their chief occupations.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Elf bolt, weapons, and utensils

By

Whoever finds an elf bolt should preserve it with much care, as the possessor of it is always secured against death from such a weapon.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Good Neighbours

By

The farmer was agreeably surprised to find that the sack out of which he had already sown a large field did not diminish, and was still the same in weight and size as when he met the fairy.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Relation with Men

By

The wife of a farmer in Lothian had fallen into the hands of the fairies, and, during the probationary year, sometimes appeared on a Sunday, among her children, combing their hair.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Sea Elves

By

His guide produced an enormous knife, and he already thought that his end was come; when the latter quieted his fears, and asked him if he had never before seen the knife?

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Spiteful Tricks

By

A thick fog concealed the road, and confused his senses. Every stone was, in the farmer's eyes, as large as a mountain; every little brook seemed to flow in an opposite direction.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: the Brownie

By

So cheap and useful a servant is naturally very valuable, but cannot be obtained with money. He continues in a family so long as a member of it survives.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: the Elf bull

By

The elf bull is small in comparison with the real one; of a mouse colour, has upright ears, short horns and legs; his hair is short, smooth, and shining like an otter.

EuropeScotland

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Elves in Scotland: Their Skills

By

Every fairy unites in his own person the most various trades: he is his own weaver, tailor, and shoemaker.

EuropeScotland

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Lame Molly

By

The good maid, wishing to save her fellow-damsel so long a suffering, tried with might and main to bear in mind the name of the potent herb. At length she dropped asleep, and when she opened her eyes, she knew nothing at all about the matter.

EuropeEnglandDevon

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The Baker’s Daughter

By

When the girl thought the bread should be ready she looked in the oven and was very much amazed to find a very large loaf of bread. She pretended to look about the oven as if in search of something.

EuropeEnglandHerefordshire

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The Brown Man of the Moors

By

His dress was entirely brown, the colour of the brackens, and his head covered with frizzled red hair. His countenance was expressive of the most savage ferocity, and his eyes glared like those of a bull.

EuropeEnglandNorthumberland

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The Elves in Ireland

By

During the summer nights, when the moon shines, and particularly in harvest-time, the Elves come out of their secret dwellings, and assemble for the dance in certain favourite spots, which are hidden and secluded places.

EuropeIreland

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The Fairies’ Cup

By

A great tumult arose at the banquet on account of his taking away the cup, and all the guests pursued him, but the peasant escaped by the fleetness of the beast he rode.

EuropeEnglandYorkshire

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The Fairy Children

By

A boy and his sister were found near the mouth of a pit. They were different in the colour of their skin from all the people of our habitable world, for their skin was tinged of a green colour.

EuropeEnglandSuffolk

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The Mad Pranks of Robin Goodfellow

By

When Robin was grown to six years of age, he was so knavish that all the neighbours did complain of him; for no sooner was his mother’s back turned, but he was in one knavish action or another.

EuropeCeltic Peoples

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The Pwcca

By

The little fellow with the lantern turned round and uttered with all his might a loud and most malicious laugh; upon which he blew out his candle.

EuropeWales

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