Fairy tales Collection

87 stories

The Elves and the Shoemaker

By

The little men began to stitch, to pierce, and to hammer so cleverly and quickly with their little fingers that the shoemaker's eyes could scarcely follow them, so full of wonder was he.

EuropeGermany

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The Emperor’s New Clothes

By

No one would let it be known that he could see nothing, for that would have proved that he was unfit for office or that he was very, very stupid.

EuropeDenmark

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The Fairy

By

The unfortunate child had to go twice a day to draw water more than a mile and a half from the house, and bring home a pitcherful of it.

EuropeFrance

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The Feather of Bright Finist the Falcon

By

Wherever he came from, Bright Finist the Falcon of Flowery Feathers wheeled before her, sprang in through the window, struck the floor, and became a young man.

EuropeRussia

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The Fir Tree

By

When Christmas-time approached, quite young trees were felled, sometimes trees which were neither so old nor so large as this Fir Tree. These young trees were just the most beautiful.

EuropeDenmark

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The Frog Prince

By

‘Your pearls and jewels, and your golden crown are not for me,’ answered the frog; ‘but if you would love me, and have me for your companion, then would I dive below the water and fetch you your golden ball again.’

EuropeGermany

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The Frog Prince

By

The Frog, as soon as he had received the King’s daughter's promise, drew his head under the water and dived down, swam up again with the ball in his mouth, and threw it on the grass.

EuropeEngland

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The Gallant Tailor

By

There sat some giants by the fire, and each had a roasted sheep in his hand. The little tailor looked round and thought, ‘There is more elbow-room here than in my workshop.’

EuropeGermany

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The Garden of Health

By

Enrique sat down on some stones to weep over his sorrow, and there prayed to heaven for his sister's life. A kid which was gracing near the spot heard the sound of his lamentations.

EuropeSpain

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The Golden Goose

By

The King had an only daughter who was so serious that no one could make her laugh; therefore he had given out that whoever should make her laugh should have her in marriage.

EuropeGermany

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The Golden Mountain

By

A rich, proud merchant, worth many, many thousands, came along in a gilded carriage. All the fellows at the market place, as soon as they perceived him, rushed away and hid themselves in the corners. Only one remained.

EuropeRussia

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The Goose-Girl

By

‘If you are thirsty,’ said the waiting-maid, ‘get off your horse yourself, and lie down and drink out of the water, I don't choose to be your servant.’

EuropeGermany

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The Happy Prince

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‘Far away,’ continued the statue, ‘far away in a little street there is a poor house. In a bed in the corner of the room a little boy is lying ill.’

EuropeIreland

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The Hind in the Wood

By

The Hind instantly fled, but as she was crossing a path, Prince Guerrier lodged an arrow in her leg, when her strength failed her, and she fell.

EuropeEngland

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The Juniper Tree

By

The woman felt great terror, and wondered how she could escape the blame. So that nothing should be seen, she set the boy on a chair before the door with the apple in his hand.

EuropeGermany

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The King of the Golden Mountain

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‘Perhaps I can help thee, if thou wilt promise to give me the first thing that rubs itself against thy leg when thou art at home again, and to bring it here in twelve years' time, thou shalt have as much money as thou wilt.’

EuropeGermany

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The Language of the Birds

By

‘How I wish I could understand the meaning of the different songs of all the birds! I would give half my wealth to the man who could make plain to me all the different songs of the different birds.’

EuropeRussia

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The Little Folks’ Presents

By

The two travelers in their pockets, and could not believe their eyes when they saw that they were not filled with coals, but with pure gold.

EuropeGermany

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The Little Match Girl

By

So the little girl had to walk with naked feet, which were red and blue with cold. No one had bought anything of her the live-long day; no one had given her a penny.

EuropeDenmark

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The Little Mermaid

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‘I know what you want,’ said the sea witch. ‘It is stupid of you, for it will get you in trouble, my little princess. You want to get rid of your fishtail.’

EuropeDenmark

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