Stories from North America

16 stories

Frolic of the Wild Things

By and

Lean Gray Wolf comes creeping, creeping, creeping up. He smells in the snow the tracks of the little white rabbits. He sniffs, and sniffs, and sniffs.

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How Manabozho Made the Land

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Once there was a flood over all the world. ‘Save us, Manabozho,’ cried the Ox. The Beaver and the Moose and the tricky Raccoon cried for help; so did the Elk and the Wolf, the Fox and the Hopper, and all the rest.

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How Manabozho Went Fishing

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Manabozho heard how the king of the fishes was treating the little fishes. He sent him word that he was to stop, but Me-she-nah-ma-gwai did not obey. ‘Very well,’ said Manabozho; ‘I shall punish this ruler.’

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How Summer Conquered Winter

By

There was silence for several moments, then the Winter Manito laid aside his scepter of ice and said, ‘Thou art welcome.’

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King of India’s Library

By

Unfortunately, Dabshelim, during this process of melting down his library, grew old, and saw no probability of living long enough to exhaust its quintessence to the last volume.

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Manabozho’s Adventure with the Sea Serpent

By

The sea serpents were angry with Manabozho because he had killed the king of the fishes. So they determined to have revenge on him.

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Manabozho’s Adventure with the Shining Magician

By

Just then Ma-Ma, the large Woodpecker, lighted on a tree, and said to the Rabbit: ‘Manabozho, there is only one place where you can hurt the Shining Magician. That is on the crown of his head.’

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On the Causes of the Epidemic

By

...and from this mass may be distinctly seen bubbles filled with noxious gas continually evolving.

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Rip Van Winkle

By

‘That flagon last night,’ thought Rip Van Winkle, ‘has addled my poor head sadly.’

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The First Summer in the New World

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One day the Ground Hog and the Badger and the Mole came to the Great White Rabbit. ‘Manabozho,’ they said, ‘we keep making burrows for ourselves in the ground, and hiding there away from the Sun. Why is this?’

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The First Travels of Paupukewis

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The Gray Wolf said: ‘Paupukewis, try to remember that it is not a long tail which makes a good hunter.’

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The Food that Belonged to All

By

Father Badger persisted that it was more blessed to give than to keep for one's self and that food belonged to all.

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The Further Adventures of Paupukewis and the Wolves

By

Paupukewis was so tricky himself that he thought the old Gray Wolf was going to hurt him in some way. So he kept one eye uncovered, and watched.

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The Story of Hans Christian Andersen

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The poor cobbler’s son was now known and loved throughout all Denmark. But still it was not until several years later that Andersen became really ‘famous.’

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The Story of the Pine Trees

By

As the weather grew colder, many of the animals suffered greatly. But the pine trees and the cedars did not mind the cold. ‘Why are they so happy when we feel so uncomfortable?’ asked the animals. ‘Because they have the secret of fire,’ answered Manabozho. ‘If you can get it from them, you will be warm.’

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The Summer Maker

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The animals all said they were willing to follow and help Ojeeb, and begged him to tell them his plan.

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