Topic Princess

36 stories

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp

Unknown writer

The magician threw on the fire a powder he had about him, at the same time saying some magical words. The earth trembled and opened in front of them, disclosing a square flat stone with a brass ring in the middle to raise it by.

Arab worldMiddle East

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Aladdin, and the Wonderful Lamp

By

This strange man was no uncle of Aladdin, nor was he related at all to him; but he was a wicked magician, who wanted to make use of the lad's services.

EuropeEngland

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Briar Rose

By

The Princess ascended a narrow, winding staircase and reached a little door. A rusty key was sticking in the lock, and when she turned it the door flew open. In a little room sat an old woman with a spindle, spinning her flax busily.

EuropeGermany

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Carabi! Carabo!

By

The horse gave a jump in order to rise in the air and commenced his flight, but this time he was not alone; for when waving his tail it caught up good little Arthur, winding itself round his body.

EuropeSpain

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Cinderella

By

The new wife brought two daughters home with her, and they were beautiful and fair in appearance, but at heart were black and ugly.

EuropeGermany

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Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper

By

Her godmother simply touched her with her wand, and, at the same moment, her clothes were turned into cloth of gold and silver, all decked with jewels.

EuropeFrance

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Donkey-Skin

By

The young Princess threw herself at the feet of the King her father and conjured him not to constrain her to consent to his unnatural desire.

EuropeFrance

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Ivan Tsarevich, the Fire‑Bird, and the Gray Wolf

By

Tsar Vwislav had one favorite apple-tree, and on that tree grew apples all golden. The Fire-bird used to sit on the favorite apple-tree, pluck from it golden apples, and then fly away.

EuropeRussia

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Ivanoushka the Simpleton

By

Our old man lived on with his sons until finally his hour came to die. He called his three sons and said to them: ‘Dear children of mine, my dying hour is at hand and ye must fulfill my will.’

EuropeRussia

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Marya Morevna

Unknown writer

Koschei the Deathless seized Marya Morevna and carried her off, and Prince Ivan sat down on a stone and wept. He wept and wept and started off in search of Marya Morevna.

EuropeRussia

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Riquet of the Tuft

By

He was born with a little tuft of hair upon his head, which made them call him Riquet with the Tuft, for Riquet was the family name.

EuropeFrance

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Seven Simeons

By

So it was with the Tsar Archidei; he was rich and clever, besides being a handsome fellow; but he could not find a bride to his taste, a bride with wit and beauty equal to his own. And this was the cause of the Tsar Archidei's sorrow and distress.

EuropeRussia

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The Frog Prince

By

‘Your pearls and jewels, and your golden crown are not for me,’ answered the frog; ‘but if you would love me, and have me for your companion, then would I dive below the water and fetch you your golden ball again.’

EuropeGermany

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The Frog Prince

By

The Frog, as soon as he had received the King’s daughter's promise, drew his head under the water and dived down, swam up again with the ball in his mouth, and threw it on the grass.

EuropeEngland

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The Gallant Tailor

By

There sat some giants by the fire, and each had a roasted sheep in his hand. The little tailor looked round and thought, ‘There is more elbow-room here than in my workshop.’

EuropeGermany

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The Golden Goose

By

The King had an only daughter who was so serious that no one could make her laugh; therefore he had given out that whoever should make her laugh should have her in marriage.

EuropeGermany

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The Goose-Girl

By

‘If you are thirsty,’ said the waiting-maid, ‘get off your horse yourself, and lie down and drink out of the water, I don't choose to be your servant.’

EuropeGermany

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The Hind in the Wood

By

The Hind instantly fled, but as she was crossing a path, Prince Guerrier lodged an arrow in her leg, when her strength failed her, and she fell.

EuropeEngland

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The Jumpers

By

‘Well, I’ll give my daughter to the one who jumps highest!’ said the king; ‘for it would look so mean to let these people jump for nothing!’

EuropeDenmark

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The King of the Golden Mountain

By

‘Perhaps I can help thee, if thou wilt promise to give me the first thing that rubs itself against thy leg when thou art at home again, and to bring it here in twelve years' time, thou shalt have as much money as thou wilt.’

EuropeGermany

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