The Daw in Borrowed Plumes

By Charles H. Bennett

Illustrated by the author

A rich vulgar Daw, who had a mind to be genteel, tricked herself out in all the gay feathers which fell from the fashionable Peacocks, and upon the credit of these borrowed ornaments valued herself above all the birds of the air.

Illustration for The Daw in Borrowed Plumes by Charles H. Bennett

But this absurd vanity got her the envy of all the high-born birds with whom she wished to associate; who, indeed, upon the discovery of the truth, by common consent fell to pluming her, and when each bird had taken her own feather, this silly Daw had nothing left wherewith to cover her naked vulgarity.

Moral.

Fine feathers do not always make fine birds.

From The Fables of Æsop and Others, Translated into Human Nature, by Charles H. Bennett.
London: W. Kent and Company, 1857.

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