The Family Elm

Illustrated by George Inness

In the village of Crawley there is an Elm of great size, in the hollow trunk of which a poor woman gave birth to an infant, and where she afterwards resided for a long time.

The tree which is a great curiosity is still standing, but as the parish is not willing to be burthened with all the young elms that might be brought forth from the trunk of this singular tree, the lord of the manor has very wisely put up a door to the entrance of this new lying-in-hospital, which is kept locked, except upon particular occasions, when the neighbours meet to enjoy their pipe, and tell old tales in the cavity of the elm, which is capable of containing a party of more than a dozen.

The Elm Tree by George Inness

The Elm Tree by George Inness

The interior of this tree is paved with bricks, and in other respects made comfortable for its temporary occupants.

From The cabinet of curiosities, or, Wonders of the world displayed,
London, Printed for J. Limbird, 1824.

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