The Kennel in Council

By Mary Boyle

“Well, to be sure,” said the Newfoundland, “the Expected Spaniel has arrived, only instead of One Spaniel there are Two.”

Captain Gun has but One Spaniel” remarked a Pug.

“True,” answered the Newfoundland, “and how are we to Decide as to the Impostor?”

“That the Impostor will do for us,” said the blind Collie, who was an Oracle, “Meanwhile, I will Listen.”

Illustration for The Kennel in Council by Mary Boyle

In stepped the Two Claimants, both well-bred dogs, apparently not a Pin to Choose between them.

“We are very Pleased to see you,” was the Newfoundland's greeting.

One Spaniel gave a Condescending Sniff.

“Thank you,” said the Other dog, quietly. After that the Collie and the Newfoundland Talked Together. The Collie waxed warm in his Denunciation of one of the dogs.

“Still,” persisted the Newfoundland, “I’ve counted All points, and the Impostor, as you call him, is the Better Bred.”

“That may be,” assented the blind Collie, “That is but Accident of Birth. It is speech and manners that Betray one’s Training, and you must Allow that any dog which comes from Captain Gun's will Know how to Comport Himself. Only one of the two dogs Thanked you for your Greeting. The Impostor Sniffed. Let him be Turned Away.”

Moral.

False colors make a dangerous sail,
When truth is out your schemes will fail.

From Æsop Redivivus, by Mary Boyle.
London, New York, 1890.

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Fables

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