The Simple Stork

By Mary Boyle

“What are you doing?” said a Stork to a Fox. “I’m having a Sip of Wine,” he answered.

“What does it Taste like?” asked the Stork who was Very Thirsty.

“First rate! Have you Never tasted wine?”

“No,” replied the Stork, honestly enough.

“Why you’re no Stork at all!” exclaimed the Fox. “You’re a Goose, that’s what you are. Fancy a Bird of your Social Position never drinking wine. The Storks where I come from drink wine Every Day.”

“Indeed,” said the Bird, in Wonder.

“And they Grow fat and merry. Their plumage is sublime, and their Eyes—their Eyes,” repeated the Fox, gaining time to coin a Fitting Simile, “why, my Dear, their Eyes Shine like Diamonds.” The Stork reflected, and Reynard continued, “I’ve never seen Such a subdued looking Bird of Your species Before. I suppose it is owing to your Never having Drunk Wine.”

“What is it to looked Subdued?” questioned the simple Stork.

“Well—aw—to look as if your Own Tail didn’t Belong to You.”

“Oh,” said the Stork, then after a moment’s thought, “what would you Advise to me Do?”

“Drink wine,” said Reynard.

“How can I Drink it?” asked the Stork.

“After the General Fashion, I usually drink with my mouth. You’ve a pretty Long Beak of your own, which is a Decided Advantage.”

“But it is Such a funny vessel, I can’t Get my beak in.”

“Oh yes you can. Try.”

And the Foolish Stork did try.

Illustration for The Simple Stork by Mary Boyle

“I can’t drink,” she said, from the Depths of the Bottle.

“Further Down, further Down,” advised the Fox.

“And yet I can’t Drink,” said the Stork, in a Muffled Voice.

“Then pull your head out,” said the Fox.

“I can’t,” said the Stork.

“Sure?”

“Yes, sure.”

“Very well then, keep your head where it is. There’s very Little Picking on it,” he observed. “Now I can have my Breakfast, sure, I’ve Waited long Enough.” And the Wicked Fox Ate up the poor Stork.

Moral.

Beware of strangers, who would fain simplicity deride,
Don’t listen to their foolish talk,
Or emulate their pride.

From Æsop Redivivus, by Mary Boyle.
London, New York, 1890.

Find stories similar to The Simple Stork

Collection:

Fables

Author:

Illustrator:

Unknown

Region of origin:

EuropeEngland

Reading time:

More stories you might like

The Baker’s Daughter

By

When the girl thought the bread should be ready she looked in the oven and was very much amazed to find a very large loaf of bread. She pretended to look about the oven as if in search of something.

EuropeEnglandHerefordshire

read

The Garden of Health

By

Enrique sat down on some stones to weep over his sorrow, and there prayed to heaven for his sister's life. A kid which was gracing near the spot heard the sound of his lamentations.

EuropeSpain

read

The First Rabbits

By

The star children all began to cry again. Just then the fairy mother of the sky came with a torch to light the star lamps. ‘Crying again?’ she said. ‘What’s the matter now?’

East AsiaJapan

read

Oshidori

By

That night Sonjo dreamed a dreary dream. It seemed to him that a beautiful woman came into his room, and stood by his pillow, and began to weep.

East AsiaJapan

read

Find stories