The Teeny Tiny Woman

By Ada M. Skinner and Eleanor L. Skinner

Illustrated by Blanche Fisher Wright

Illustration for The Teeny Tiny Woman by Blanche Fisher Wright

Once upon a time there was a teeny tiny woman. She lived all alone in a teeny tiny house.

One night when this teeny tiny woman was in her teeny tiny bed she heard a noise. Up she jumped from her teeny tiny bed and lighted her teeny tiny candle.

She looked under her teeny tiny bed. There was nothing there. She looked behind her teeny tiny door. There was nothing there.

So this teeny tiny woman blew out her teeny tiny candle and crept back into her teeny tiny bed.

The teeny tiny woman closed her teeny tiny eyes. She was just going to sleep when she heard a noise.

Up she jumped out of her teeny tiny bed. She lighted her teeny tiny candle and crept down her teeny tiny stairs. She went into her teeny tiny kitchen. She looked under her teeny tiny chairs. There was nothing there. She looked under her teeny tiny stove. There was nothing there.

So she crept up her teeny tiny stairs. She blew out her teeny tiny candle. She crept once more into her teeny tiny bed.

This teeny tiny woman closed her teeny tiny eyes again. She was just going to sleep when she heard a noise.

Up she jumped out of her teeny tiny bed.

She lighted her teeny tiny candle. She crept down her teeny tiny stairs. She went into her teeny tiny kitchen. She crept up to her teeny tiny cupboard. She opened the teeny tiny door. She took a teeny tiny peep in. And out jumped—boo!

“Well, well,” said the teeny tiny woman. “To be frightened by nothing but—boo!”

From Nursery tales from many lands, by Ada M. Skinner and Eleanor L. Skinner.
New York, Chicago, Boston: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1917.

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Nursery tales

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EuropeEngland

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