Unity is Strenght

By Mary Boyle

“I‘m as good as you,” said the Pen to the Ink. “Perhaps better,” answered the Ink, Wrathfully.

“I do all the Work,” said the Pen.

“And can make an Impression, can’t you?”

“No,” spluttered the Ink, smarting under the Bitter Sarcasm, “I have to drag you About with me to do that.”

“You are a Conceited Upstart,” sneered the Ink.

“All the same, you are Glad enough to Flow to my delicate nib.”

“It seems to me that, in the interest of Both of us, ’twere better that this Vexed Question should be settled.”

Illustration for Unity is Strenght by Mary Boyle

Writer,” screamed the Ink above his liquid, “Writer, which does the Most work, the Pen or Me?”

For a moment the writer Considered. Then he said, “When both of you have Answered the Question I am about to put, I will Answer Yours. What would Either of you do Without Me?”

“Oh!” said the Pen, “I Never thought of That.”

“Ah!” mused the Pen, “I Never looked at it in that light.”

“No,” said the writer thoughtfully, “You were so Wrapt Up in self that you Failed to Recognise the claims of other people. Rowers in the same Craft, had better Pull Together if they Fain would reach the Shore.”

Moral.

Strife is a consuming fire,
And folly fans the flame.

From Æsop Redivivus, by Mary Boyle.
London, New York, 1890.

Fables

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